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Cabot office weekly roundup – 20 July 2012


Herbert Huppert
This week we have been holding our Cabot Summer School on risk and uncertainty in natural hazards.  The week has gone very well and I have received some very positive comments from attendees.  We had some fantastic speakers including Herbert Huppert, Jonty Rougier, Steve Sparks, Willy Aspinall, Li Chen, Tamsin Edwards, Philippa Bayley and Thorsten Wagener.  Cabot would like to say a great big thank you to all of you for making the Cabot Summer School such a success.  We’re very much looking forward to next year.
Paul F. Hoffman

This week, Cabot member Rich Pancost secured Paul F. Hoffman of Snowball Earth fame as the next Science Faculty Colloquium speaker in September. 

I saw the new templates for our website today.  Its all looking good and I’m quite excited about the implementation of its new look.  By the end of the summer I hope to have it all up and running.

We would like to congratulate Cabot member Professor Mark Eisler and his team who evaluated the effectiveness of a low-cost decision support tool as a diagnostic aid by observing whether its introduction to veterinary and animal health officers undertaking primary animal health care in Uganda could lead to changes in clinical practice.  Improved diagnosis is necessary for the effective management of endemic cattle diseases in sub-Saharan Africa.
 
We would also like to congratulate Gareth Jones, Stephen Harris and Emma Stone who received £559,705 from NERC for a project on ‘Experimental approaches to determine the impacts of light pollution: field studies on bats and insects’.


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