Skip to main content

Cabot Director nominated for Arctic Sea ice challenge

Cabot Institute Director Prof Rich Pancost has been nominated by fellow colleague Prof Steve Lewandowsky to do the Arctic Sea Ice Bucket challenge to raise awareness of the impacts of climate change on Arctic sea ice and to help raise funds for climate research.

Watch Prof Steve Lewandowsky's Arctic Sea Ice Bucket Challenge


Watch Prof Rich Pancost do the Arctic Sea Ice Bucket Challenge with a special audience...



Like this?  Check out our blogs and content on sea ice, glacier melt, sea level rise and climate change:
The controversy of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Climate lessons from the past: Are we already committed to a warmer and wetter planet?
Chasing Ice with the All Party Parliamentary Climate Change Group
Unprecedented melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Jonathan Bamber talks sea level rise on Emmy Award winning show
Jonathan Bamber talk on Radio New Zealand - Melting Ice, Rising Sea

Popular posts from this blog

Cutting edge collaborative research – using climate data to advance understanding

Perhaps you saw my recent blog post about an upcoming University of Bristol-led hackathon, which was to be part of a series following the Met Office’s Climate Data Challenge in March. The University of Bristol hackathon took place virtually earlier this month and was opened out to all UK researchers to produce cutting-edge research using Climate Model Intercomparison Project 6 (CMIP6) data. The event themes ranged from climate change to oceanography, biogeochemistry and more, and, as promised, here’s what happened. An enabling environment The event wouldn’t have run smoothly without the hard work of the organising team including James Thomas from the Jean Golding Institute who set up all the Github documentation  and provided technical support prior and during the hackathon event. The hackathon was also a great opportunity to road test a new collaboration space that the Centre for Environmental Data Analysis (CEDA) have developed to provide a new digital platform, JASMIN Notebook Ser

Are you a journalist looking for climate experts? We've got you covered

We've got lots of media trained climate change experts. If you need an expert for an interview, here is a list of Caboteers you can approach. All media enquiries should be made via  Victoria Tagg , our dedicated Media and PR Manager at the University of Bristol. Email victoria.tagg@bristol.ac.uk or call +44 (0)117 428 2489. Climate change / climate emergency / climate science / climate-induced disasters Dr Eunice Lo - expert in changes in extreme weather events such as heatwaves and cold spells , and how these changes translate to negative health outcomes including illnesses and deaths. Follow on Twitter @EuniceLoClimate . Professor Daniela Schmidt - expert in the causes and effects of climate change on marine systems . Dani is also a Lead Author on the IPCC reports. Dani will be at COP26. Dr Katerina Michalides - expert in drylands, drought and desertification and helping East African rural communities to adapt to droughts and future climate change. Follow on Twitter @_k

How scientists and policymakers collaborate towards sustainable Bristol

In the world facing increasingly complex and interdisciplinary challenges, our job descriptions expand to account for new collaborations, duties, and types of knowledge to engage with. Civil servants are now expected to ground their policies in evidence, while scientists are required to translate their findings so that they’re useful to the citizens, industry practitioners or politicians. Climate action is no different. It comes to life at the curious intersection of activism, political will, market incentives, democratic mandate and, of course, scientific knowledge. As a university researcher, I am on a mission to ensure academic knowledge serves Bristol’s transition to the sustainable city. An effective collaboration across the worlds of science and policy requires some professional unlearning. Convoluted and jargon-filled academic writing style is not going to cut it if we’re serious about influencing ‘the real world’ (sorry). Similarly, our traditional output formats are simply too