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Cabot Director nominated for Arctic Sea ice challenge

Cabot Institute Director Prof Rich Pancost has been nominated by fellow colleague Prof Steve Lewandowsky to do the Arctic Sea Ice Bucket challenge to raise awareness of the impacts of climate change on Arctic sea ice and to help raise funds for climate research.

Watch Prof Steve Lewandowsky's Arctic Sea Ice Bucket Challenge


Watch Prof Rich Pancost do the Arctic Sea Ice Bucket Challenge with a special audience...



Like this?  Check out our blogs and content on sea ice, glacier melt, sea level rise and climate change:
The controversy of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Climate lessons from the past: Are we already committed to a warmer and wetter planet?
Chasing Ice with the All Party Parliamentary Climate Change Group
Unprecedented melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet
Jonathan Bamber talks sea level rise on Emmy Award winning show
Jonathan Bamber talk on Radio New Zealand - Melting Ice, Rising Sea

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